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Wind down this summer in Northumberland’s natural beauty
Posted on

August 24, 2018


Isn’t modern life hectic? Whatever your commitments, day to day life take its toll on us all - constant rushing around; work and family obligations; travel and the constant buzz of modern technology. We all need a break from the hustle and bustle of daily life, so why not let Northumberland’s isolated beauty soothe your soul?

 

Northumberland is one of the least populated counties in England, and as such is famous for its dark skies. The lack of light pollution means that this area is the perfect for star gazers, and both amateurs and professionals alike flock to the Northumberland Area Of Natural Beauty (AONB), along England’s east coast where you can gaze out to the heavens across the depths of the North Sea. You may even stand a chance of seeing the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights, with the coastline being one of the best places in England to spot this natural wonder. Using a telescope or even binoculars, what better way to take a break from 21st Century life, nestled amongst the sand dunes staring into the infinite splendour of the night sky. If you’re visiting in the Autumn, don’t miss the North Pennines Stargazing Festival.

 

With over 40 miles of coastline and a national park spanning over 400 square miles, you will be spoilt for choice of historical sites here in Northumberland. Inland, in Northumberland National Park, visit Hadrian Wall’s built by the Romans in 120AD, to defend Roman Britain from the North, trails for 73miles across the landscape and affords stunning opportunities for walking.

 

Feel truly away from the daily grind as you breathe in fresh air from atop the Cheviot Hills, marking the border between England and Scotland, or look out across the heather topped moorland. The seascape views from Northumberland’s coast will instil a sense of tranquillity, especially looking out towards the craggy cliffs of the Farne Islands or LIndesfarne, a unique tidal island whose grassy banks give rise to the stunning ruins of an ancient priory. Both a certainly worth a visit, catch a guided boat trip to the Farne Islands, visit https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/farne-islands/features/getting-to-the-farnes for more information,  and drive the causeway from Beal to the stunning Holy Island, Lindesfarne.

 

Try your hand at photographing the flatland or coastal landscapes, or if you’re visiting in November, why not enrol on a landscape photography course, like The Introduction to Landscape Photogaphy course on 4th, whatever your experience or equipment, learn tips from a professional.

 

Why not take some time out to explore flora and fauna of the area; with day to day lives so full and busy and particularly for those of us who live in towns and cities, most of us do not appreciate the diverse and interesting natural world around us. The Northumberland Wildlife Trust (NWT) runs a wide range of activities, many costing just a couple of pounds, like a guided walk for example Explore Northumberlandia at Cramlington (see here for more info) , Bird Identification and after dark exploration spotting and learning about Northumberland’s nocturnal residents. The NWT website details all upcoming events and there is sure to be an activity for everyone.